I get my hormones filled at one pharmacy, my other medications (antidepressants, anti-anxiety pills) filled at another. The pharmacy where I get my anxiety and depression related meds (CVS) is substantially closer to home. The one with the hormones is quite a distance. I’ve kept these split between the two pharmacies for a couple reasons, but mostly it was due to my hormones being much cheaper at Walgreens (before I had insurance through work).

Now, with actual health insurance, even though price-wise, I could consolidate these, yet I don’t. I suppose I just haven’t gotten around to it.

My name was legally changed in April 2013. Even still, my prescriptions haven’t gotten the updated name on them just yet. For a while, I was waiting for my insurance card to update. After that, I hadn’t been in to see the doctor since that time to get any changes made.

Anyway.

I went to Walgreens to pick up my hormone refill. This isn’t just any Walgreens, but rather it’s the one inside the Howard Brown Health Center (our local LGBT medical care facility). I went in just to find that my spironolactone (testosterone blocker) wasn’t ready. I explained that I was completely out and needed a refill.

Pharmacist #1: He needs a refill on his spironolactone. Can we get that for him?
Pharmacist #2: Get him a 3 day supply until we can get that filled.

Thinking, yes, okay, that’s probably just how I have to be in the system, I guess (but still wondering why they’d call me “he” when I was obviously presenting female, trying to refill my hormones, of all things). I asked, “hey, so, my name has been legally changed. Can I update that now?” They insisted that I just wait until my prescriptions were all written out to that name. *sigh* Okay.

When I was leaving, I stopped by the front desk at Howard Brown to set up my next appointment. They asked me my last name and date of birth. They loudly then said my birth name (as others were around). *sigh* Yes, that was me, sure.

The appointment was scheduled, but still under the old name in the system. I mentioned that my name had legally changed, but much like the pharmacy, I was told that I should just wait until I see the doctor to update any of that information

So, my name is not, in a legal sense, that old name. Why is it that these organizations, these LGBT-friendly organizations, make me jump through a series of hoops just to get that fixed to reflect my actual, legal name?

It all just bummed me out.